Insider's Tips: Tip #15 - Master of Ceremony

Who’s your master?

Photo courtesy of Unplugged Photography

Photo courtesy of Unplugged Photography

The other month, I attended a meeting of local bridal consultants.  At this meeting, a DJ was speaking to the planners about certain issues that arise at a wedding on the entertainment side.  He brought up some concerns that I have never thought about, so I am bringing them to you, in case it has slipped your mind as well.  (Please note:  As always, if you hire a professional wedding planner, they will know all of these tips, so you won’t have to.)

If you hire a band for your wedding, you will need a master of ceremony of sorts.  Some bands don’t mind announcing your bridal party’s entrance, or directing your guests to the cake cutting.  But what if your band is one of those that only plays music and refuses to make any announcements.  Who will be left to hold the microphone?

Professional DJs already have the ability to take the reigns at the reception.  They do it all of the time.  They are there to help with the flow of the reception or take instruction from the wedding planner on the timeline, as well as get everyone on the dance floor.  They also can play the music during the band’s break time, so that your dance floor is always hoppin’.  And unlike your Aunt Sally, have experience talking on a microphone and not (hopefully) sounding silly.

We have an example from the beginning of this year.  Amazing wedding, planner, band, videographer, everything, but several days before the wedding, it was realized that the band would not be in charge of announcements at the reception.  Although there was a planner involved, she had more important things to attend to, so she was not going to be able to take the mic.  Thankfully, the couple had rented a photo booth (brought it by a local DJ who happens to be a Master of Ceremony), and he was able to step in and make all of the announcements for the evening.   He was able to sound knowledgeable and professional, which was appreciated by the bride and groom and their families.

Another example actually happened again this past weekend. The venue had arranged that during the band's breaks that we would do the major events of the reception (cake cutting, bouquet and garter, etc). Well the band was on a break, so they were not going to be around to count the toss down or ask for the single ladies. The venue planner didn't want to talk into the microphone, we were working, so after a few polite requests, one of the band members agreed to skip his break and help with the mic.

Bands and DJs can work in conjunction with each other nicely.  I am not saying you shouldn’t hire your favorite band just because they refuse to be in charge of the announcements, but be aware.

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Angela S. DeaverMain Street Productions | Birmingham Wedding Videographer

"It’s a beginning and an ending, it’s glorious and sad, and it’s intimate and public.  In your lifetime there will be few milestones that will change the course of your future more than your wedding day. Main Street Productions understands and believes in the emotions of life. We bring these emotions to our art and look forward to presenting you a glimpse into your own past." - John Deaver, Main Street Productions